Easy DIY Felt Pom Pom Pillows

Accent pillows are one of the easiest¬†things you can use to change the look of a sofa or chair in your home, and they’re also one of the easiest DIY projects to do. I wanted to bring a little color and fun to a bench I have in my living room so turned to my fabric scrap collection for something to make pillows with. I had some felt and pom poms and thought they would be perfect pillows for the holiday season. To be honest they might stay well after that.

To make a basic pillow you just need to cut a piece of fabric to the size and shape of the pillow you want to cover. Leave about an inch on each side for seam allowance. Sometimes I cut the fabric on a fold so I end up with one longer piece rather than two pieces. Either way works fine.

DIY Felt PomPom Pillows.jpgSew the pieces together at the sides, leaving one side open.

DIY Felt Pom Pom Pillows.jpg

Turn your pillow case inside out so the seams are inside. By the way you can do these steps with fabric glue like liquid stitch if you don’t have a sewing machine.

DIY Felt PomPom Pillows (2).jpg

Insert your pillow stuffing and then use a slip stitch or fabric glue to close the open end.

DIY Felt Pom Pom Pillows (2).jpg

Next figure out where you want to apply your pom pom trim and use fabric glue to adhere it! Easy!

DIY Felt Pom Pom Pillows (4).jpg

I also cut some of the pom poms off and glued them on in a random pattern.

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There you have it. Easy pom pom pillows!

DIY Yellow Fringe Blackout Curtains

You guys, let me start by saying I’m bummed because I lost all of the how-to pics from this project when my old computer died, BUT I still wanted to share how easy it is to make your own curtains.

I couldn’t find any light blocking curtains that I liked for my bedroom so I took on the task of making my own. Curtains are the easiest thing to make if you can sew a straight line. All you need is enough fabric to make a panel long enough to fit your window and hem all four sides, leaving a big enough loop at the top to fit a curtain rod through. I found a really nice and inexpensive fabric in the perfect shade of buttercup yellow, but the problem was that it was too thin and let a lot of light through. We’re not morning people so this was a no-no. To remedy the problem all I did was lined my fabric with an old black out curtain from IKEA. Easy enough!

 

IMG_4254.jpgDoing that completely blocked any light from coming into my bedroom and also added some much needed weight and heft to the panel.

IMG_4264.jpgFor some extra flair I added a strip of vintage looking rope fringe to the top.IMG_4270.jpg

 

 

IMG_4252.jpgTada! Stay tuned for more bedroom decor updates and be sure to follow along on Instagram.

DIY Striped Bed Skirt and Headboard

If you would have told me that finding a bed skirt would be the most difficult part of my bedroom makeover I wouldn’t have believed you. I thought I would just be able to pick up your run of the mill white skirt at any home goods store and be done with it. Nope. Of course not. Story of my life.

I had to exchange 3 bed skirts before deciding I was better off making one on my own. Either they were too short, too long, too sheer, or the wrong color. Who knew?! Luckily making your own custom bed skirt isn’t as hard as it may seem.

First of all, I wanted it to match my new DIY headboard so I picked up the same striped fabric from IKEA. The headboard isn’t really new, it was previously used as the backboard to my dining room banquette IKEA hack. The fabric for the bed skirt cost me about $16, much cheaper than bed skirts I was finding in stores.

DIY Bed Skirt TutorialThe first thing you need to do is figure out how long your skirt needs to be. Measure the distance from the top of your box spring to the floor. Then add 3-4 inches for seam and stapling allowance.DIY Bed Skirt TutorialMine was at 16 inches, so I cut 20 inch long strips of fabric. The fabric is 58 inches wide, so I needed 3 of these strips in order to cover 3 sides of my box spring.DIY Bed Skirt TutorialNext you need to make the hem. Fold over the long edge at 5/8″ and press.DIY Bed Skirt Tutorial

DIY Bed Skirt TutorialThen fold the raw edge under itself and press again.DIY Bed Skirt Tutorial This creates a nice clean hem. Stitch at 3/8″. If you don’t have a sewing machine you can use iron-on hem tape.

 

Once that is done, stitch the strips together at the ends to create one long strip. Then staple the raw edge directly to the box spring, making sure the hem just barely touches the ground. If you don’t have a staple gun you can use flat head tacks. 

DIY Bed Skirt TutorialDIY Bed Skirt and Headboard TutorialContinue all around the box spring. The mattress should cover the staples and it’ll look like a normal bed skirt!

 

DIY Bed Skirt and HeadboardFinally, make your bed as usual and reward yourself with a nice nap.

For instructions on how I made the headboard, click here.

DIY: Microwavable Rice Heating Pad

Owwwwie!! Ouch. I hurt. Why? Because I sprained my back doing ballerina stretches on my kitchen counter like a cool guy. I can’t bend, sit, lift, or do anything you do in normal life without pain. On top of all that, I broke my gallbladder and it needs to be removed, soooo I really need to get my back in working order STAT. Heat always helps my frequent aches and pains disappear so I’m always using my heating pad for something. Cramps, pulled muscles, tension headaches, etc etc etc. You name it. Even my abnormally low body temperature benefits from a heating pad from time to time.

I haven’t used an electric heating pad since mine got run over by a semi-truck after a road trip luggage accident a few years ago. One night I was in need of a heating pad and in a pinch went back to something I remembered from when I was younger. I had a toothache a family friend told us about making heat packs since our heating pad wasn’t comfortable on my face. She recommended trying salt but that was a dirty lie and the sock/salt combo that I tried burned up in the microwave. My mom was pretty mad. Anyway, I tried the rice version and it worked! It’s awesome and molds to your body so the heat really gets into the contours (and I have plenty hehehe). It’s also cordless so no annoying cords get in the way and it only costs pennies to make. You can use a sock, a pillow case, or make your own pouch as I demonstrate below.

All you need is fabric and rice.

DIY Rice Heating Pad

Cut your fabric (I use muslin) to the size you want. This one is for my lumbar and pelvic area so it’s about 10″x5″. Sew together at the sides leaving one end open. Turn it inside out so your seams are facing inside.

DIY Rice Heating Pad

Mix a few drops of your favorite scented oils into your rice. Without the oil the rice can smell rather…well…ricey when heated.

Cedarwood Oil *sniifffff*
Cedarwood Oil *sniifffff*

Fill the muslin pouch with the rice. Be careful not to over pack it. You want it to still be flexible to mold to your body. Sew up the open edge.

DIY Rice Heating Pad

 You can leave it just like this or you can make a cute changeable/washable pouch for it, like I prefer to do.

Cut fabric pieces 1/2 inch larger than your muslin pouch on each side. Fold over open ends and sew.

DIY Rice Heating Pad

Fold over a few inches on one side.

DIY Rice Heating Pad

Then bring right sides together and sew bottom and side edges together.

DIY Rice Heating Pad

Turn it right-side out and it’ll look like this.

DIY Rice Heating Pad

Finish turning it right-side out and you’ll see you’ve created an envelop pouch! It’s like a small pillowcase for your rice pad.

DIY Rice Heating Pad

Slip your rice pad in it like a rice-y little pillow.

DIY Rice Heating Pad

Microwave it 30 seconds at a time until it’s as hot as you want it. I usually heat mine for 60-90 seconds and the heat lasts around 30-60 minutes until I feel the need to reheat it. The weight from the pack helps the heat really sink it, so PLEASE be careful not to make it too hot the first time you use it. I don’t need hate mail about how you burned yourself. Just kiddingggg. Now go enjoy your DIY heating pad!

DIY Rice Heating Pad

OOTD: Gingham Style | Sewing Projects | Blouses & Tops

I’m decorating for Halloween and I’m really excited so I’ll make this quick.

I made this blouse and it’s probably one of my favorite pieces I’ve made recently. It started out as a regular button down with an open turnover collar. I kept changing it and cut 6 different collars until it evolved into this.

Bad light. Sorry. I’ve been lazy with camera work.

I have been wearing it with my high waisted denim cigarette pants and saddle shoes. Fun, fun.

Bad cellphone pic. The usual.

 

Well, that’s all for now. Toodles, Poodles!

DIY: Easy Sew Accent Pillows

I’ve been working on an upholstery project and ended up with some pretty sizable leftover pieces of fabric. I hated the thought of them going to waste! I remembered I had a bag of polyfill sitting on my closet, so I figured it was the perfect opportunity to make accent pillows. This project is super simple and takes about 20 minutes if you have a sewing machine handy.

First, you need to two pieces of fabric, cut to whatever size you want your pillow to be.

Next, fold one edge of each of your fabric pieces down 5/8in and press with an iron. Pin fabric with right sides together, leaving the end with the folded edges open. Sew around edges with a 5/8in seam allowance.

Turn your pillowcase right side out and push out corners and press edges with an iron. Fill with your desired amount of polyfill stuffing.

Lastly, you’ll need to slip stitch the open end for a clean, finished look.

Voila! Totally easy and fabulous accent pillows!

Turning a Handbag into a Camera Bag | Upcycling Accessories | DIY Handbag Conversion Hack

When I’m not painting old furniture or scouring Craigslist for my next good find, I make my living as a wedding photographer. Until somewhat recently, one of the biggest problems for female photographers was finding a stylish camera bag to carry our lenses and accessories. There are some hip and convenient versions of your standard compartment/lens bags out there now. Kelly Moore Bags, Shootsacs, and Epiphanie are just a few of the companies offering fashionable camera bags.

We own a Shootsac, which Jvee has stolen from me and made his own. I think it’s a great bag for both men and women but I found the pockets are a little too snug for me to be able to quickly grab what I need sometimes. I thought about purchasing one of the other brands out there but wasn’t comfortable spending another $100-$250 on a camera bag I might not like. I took a trip to Ross this week to check out the handbag selection and found a bag I thought would work perfectly. The bag has compartments, zippered pockets, a flat bottom, closeable flap, durable/water-proof material, and a cross-body strap that falls at my hip. Perfect! Except there wasn’t padded compartments to separate lenses and hold my camera body for safe and easy access while shooting. Hmmm…could I do a handbag hack? I bought the bag anyway, $18…score!

I turned the bag inside-out and added 2 strips of Velcro on each side (top and bottom). I used the measurements of my existing compartment separators to determine how far apart to space the Velcro. The existing separators had the hook side of the Velcro already so I put the soft side onto the bag. I should mention I bought my Velcro prior to purchasing the bag. I meant to get black but somehow got distracted in my hurriedness and ended up leaving the store with white. Oh well. Still works. I’ll change it out later maybe.

Flipped the bag right-side-out and popped in the separators where I wanted them. After 24 hours, the Velcro adhesive becomes very durable and stays in place even when adjusting the placement of the padded panels.

Here it is! Holds 3 lenses w/hoods, a camera body w/grip, flash, and memory cards. Or, 5 lenses w/hoods, a flash, and memory cards without the camera. So comfortable and accessible! Can’t wait to try it out this weekend!